Let’s check out some exercises that will help you understand structured data types in Python better, also usually referred to as composite data types as well.

Exercise 5-a

Let's create an empty list and print its type.


list() is a function that creates an empty list. You don’t need to put anything inside list() function to achieve this. The same thing can be achieved by typing brackets: []

type() function will tell you the class type of your variable.

gift_list = []
answer_1 = type(gift_list)

Exercise 5-b

Now, we will create an empty dictionary and print its type.


dict() is a function that creates an empty list. You don’t need to put anything inside dict() function to achieve this.

The same thing can be achieved by typing curly brackets: {}

type() function will tell you the class type of your variable.

grocery_items = {}
answer_2 = type(grocery_items)

Exercise 5-c

Then we will create an empty tuple and print its type.


tuple() is a function that creates an empty list. You don’t need to put anything inside tuple() function to achieve this.

type() function will tell you the class type of your variable.

bucket_list = ()
answer_2 = type(bucket_list)

Now let’s see some more exercises about converting data types.

Exercise 5-d

Let's create a list with values in it.


list format is [] with values in it which can be separated by commas.

gift_list = ['socks', '4K drone', 'wine', 'jam', 'pajamas']

Exercise 5-e

Now let's create a dictionary with values in it.


dictionary format is {} with keys and values in it. This is usually referred as a key-value pair as well. Each key will have a colon after it which is followed by the value of the key.

grocery_list = {'banana': 4, 'milk': 2, 'bread': 1}

Exercise 5-f

Finally, let's create a tuple with values in it.


tuple format is (). It’s very similar to a list with the exception of being immutable, unlike lists.

bucket_list = ('learn Python',  'go to space', 'scuba diving', 'climb Everest')